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Timeline reconstruction of the ancient Temple
According to the religious traditions documented by J. Gordon Melton, the first Siva temple at Somanath was built at some unknown time in the past. The second temple was built at the same site by the Seuna kings of Vallabhi around 649 CE. In 725 CE, Al-Junayd, the Arab governor of Sindh, who invaded various parts of Gujarat and Rajasthan, is said to have destroyed the second temple. The Gurjara-Pratihara king Nagabhata II is said to have constructed the third temple in 815 CE, a large structure of red sandstone.[12]
According to historians, the first verifiable temple was built by the Solanki king Mularaja sometime before 997 CE, even though some historians believe that he may have renovated a smaller earlier temple.[13] However, the site of Somnath had been a pilgrimage site from ancient times on account of being a triveni sangam (the joining of three rivers — Kapila, Hiran and the mythical Sarasvati River). Soma, the Moon god, is believed to have lost his lustre due to a curse, and he bathed in the Sarasvati River at this site to regain it. The result is the waxing and waning of the moon, no doubt an allusion to the waxing and waning of the tides at this sea shore location.[14] There is no historical record of a temple destroyed by Al-Junayd. However, Nagabhata II is known to have visited tirthas in Saurashtra, including Someshvara (the Lord of the Moon) at the site, which may or may not be a reference to a Siva temple.[15]

Somnath temple, 1869
In 1024, the temple built by Mularaja was destroyed by the prominent Afghan ruler, Mahmud of Ghazni, [16][17] who raided the temple from across the Thar Desert. The temple was rebuilt by the Paramara king Bhoja of Malwa and the Solanki king Bhimdev I of Anhilwara (now Patan, Gujarat) between 1026 and 1042. This appears to have been a wooden structure, which was replaced by a stone temple by Kumarpal (r.1143-72).[18][19]
In 1296, the temple was once again destroyed by Alauddin Khilji's army.[16][19] Raja Karan of Gujarat was defeated and forced to flee. According to Taj-ul-Ma'sir of Hasan Nizami, the Sultan boasted that "fifty thousand infidels were dispatched to hell by the sword" and "more than twenty thousand slaves, and cattle beyond all calculation fell into the hands of the victors."
The temple was rebuilt by Mahipala Deva, the Chudasama king of Saurashtra in 1308 and the Linga was installed by his son Khengar sometime between 1326 and 1351.[19] In 1375, the temple was once again destroyed by Muzaffar Shah I of the Gujarat Sultanate.[19] In 1451, the temple was once again destroyed by Mahmud Begada, the Sultan of Gujarat.[16][19]
By 1665, the temple, one of many, was once again ordered destroyed by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb.[20] Later the temple was rebuilt to its same glory adjacent to the ruined one. Later on a joint effort of Peshwa of Pune, Raja Bhonsle of Nagpur, Chhatrapati Bhonsle of Kolhapur, Queen Ahilyabai Holkar of Indore & Shrimant Patilbuwa Shinde of Gwalior rebuilt the temple in 1783 at a site adjacent to the ruined temple.

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Sant Dnyaneshwar (for more info on Indian Reformists and their hitorical importance download the app :
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) played a very significant role in uniting the community.
Dnyaneshwar was born in 13th century Maharashtra during the reign of the Yadava king Ramadevarava.[4] The kingdom enjoyed peace and stability until invasions from the Delhi Sultanate started in 1296 CE.[5][6] Arts and sciences flourished under the patronage of the Yadava kings and Maharashtra attracted scholars from all over India.[7] However, this period also witnessed religious degeneration, sectarianism, superstition and ritualism which involved animal sacrifices to many local deities.[8] Dnyaneshwar would later criticise the religious degeneration of the day in his magnum opus Dnyaneshwari.[9] According to B. P. Bahirat, Dnyaneshwar emerged as the first original philosopher who wrote in the Marathi language, in this era

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